Business

Why All Your Best Employees Are Leaving You

Do you ever get that sinking feeling on your way to work? It’s that feeling you get when you never quite know when your next employee resignation letter is going to land on your desk. And it’s not a nice feeling to have: employee turnover is one of the highest costs your business faces.

The problem, though, is that many companies misdiagnose the problems. They think that there’s something wrong with their hiring process and for some reason, they’re attracting the wrong people. But more often than not, it’s a problem with the company itself. It’s not the hiring process that’s bad, it’s the culture that’s toxic.

Managers

Curt Coffman famously said in his book, First Break All the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently, that people don’t actually leave their jobs, they leave their managers. When you think about it, this is kind of absurd. The whole purpose of having a manager is to facilitate work and to make sure that teams are organized. Workers should be better off with managers, not the precise opposite. But all too often in business, economic logic gives way to personalities, and those personalities wind up wreaking havoc.

It’s no surprise that managers who don’t communicate with their employees, don’t appreciate them and don’t look after them, suffer from high turnover rates. So instead of looking at your employees or your hiring practices, ask whether your managers could be doing a better job.

Lack Of Support

One of the reasons employers find themselves managing sick leave and employee absences with shocking regularity is because their employees have a lack of support. Ask yourself the following questions: have you sat down with each employee and discussed an action plan for their future? Have you had follow-ups to make sure that that action plan has been carried out? Do the people that work at your organization feel appreciated for all the hard work that they do?

Everyone wants to be appreciated, says Mary Kay Ash, the founder of her eponymous cosmetics brand. She says that if you appreciate someone, don’t keep it all to yourself: let them know how you feel. Her company incentivises its salesforce with glamorous events, gifts, and public recognition. Kay reminds her fellow entrepreneurs that people are a company’s greatest assets, and they should be treated as such.

Negative Competition

Some companies think that adding competition to the job is a good way to motivate people and drive up standards. But it turns out that most people aren’t wired up for heavy competition, and they don’t enjoy it. If a job is making a person feel ill from stress, then they are much more likely to leave.

Endless Reorganization

If you’re going to reorganize your company, do it once and be done with it. The problem with reorganization is that it creates uncertainty. With every shuffle, people are lost and the people that remain fear for their jobs. All this uncertainty means that the people in the firm start looking for more secure work elsewhere. Not good, if you’re trying to build a cohesive team.

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How To

Top Tips to Select a Tech Project Manager

When you start a tech project of any kind, it essential to have a project manager. A project manager is that person who’s going to be the point person, ensure everything moves smoothly, and serve as a centralized hub of communication in many ways. Project managers facilitate the process that goes into the development of anything related to technology, so how do you choose this person?

The list below represents some key criteria to consider as you select a PM for your next tech project.

Match Skills Appropriately

One of the first mistakes made when selection a technology project manager is the tendency to want to hire the person with the most skills, as opposed to someone with the right skills. Even if a candidate has broad experience and expertise, that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re going to be the right fit. When matching skills, try to find the person that has what reflects most closely your project requirements. Don’t become so blinded by an incredible resume that you forget what’s critical to the core of your project.

Hone in On Soft Skills

When you’re looking for a technology project manager, there can be a tendency only to look at their skills or their training and education. Unfortunately, this is detrimental because there is a lot more that goes into managing a project than simply have the technical expertise. Think about soft skills. Some of the important characteristics to look for in a project manager include strong communication, empathy, and organization. You also want to look for someone who seems to have a good ability to look at the long-term picture, see where obstacles may exist, and who is willing to be flexible enough to adequately address challenges that arise, even if they’re unexpected.

Approach

When it comes to technology projects, there are a lot of different approaches that can be taken. One of the most popular is the agile methodology, but there are specific distinctions even within this broader category. Consider how potential project management candidates approach their work, and what training or certifications they might have. One of the most valuable certifications when it comes to technology project management is DevOps training, which refers to a framework for integration communication, collaboration, and automation to improve workflow between developers and IT professionals.

Consider Other Team Members

A project manager is going to be inherently intertwined with the members of his or her team throughout a tech project, so when you’re choosing someone, make sure that you’re also considering these people who will be working under the manager. Project managers need to be able not just to work with the people that report to them, but also effectively lead them and inspire them to stay on time and budget with the project.

The person you select to manage your technology project is often going to be the link between your organization and the final product. This person is going to determine how smoothly the project moves along, how well it stays on course time-wise, and whether or not it adheres to budgetary restrictions.

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